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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Marine bacteria as a source of dissolved fluorescence in the ocean found in the catalog.

Marine bacteria as a source of dissolved fluorescence in the ocean

Paula G. Coble

Marine bacteria as a source of dissolved fluorescence in the ocean

by Paula G. Coble

  • 239 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Woods Hole, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fluorescence.,
  • Marine bacteria.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Paula G. Coble.
    SeriesWHOI -- no.90-05., WHOI (Series) -- 90-05.
    ContributionsWoods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination273 p. :
    Number of Pages273
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15157655M

    Field investigation of the marine phosphorus (P) cycle requires the use of a variety of methods to measure the ambient concentrations of total dissolved and particulate (both organic and inorganic) matter to assess local inventories of P and to estimate P fluxes. The latter include the delivery to and losses from the ecosystem in question and the rates of microbial P uptake and microbial Cited by: Start studying Marine Biology Chapter Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

    Biogeneration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by bacteria and krill in the Southern Ocean Eva Ortega-Retuerta,a Thomas K. Frazer,b Carlos M. Duarte,c Sergio Ruiz-Halpern,c Antonio Tovar-Sa´nchez,c Jesu´s M. Arrieta,c and Isabel Rechea,d,* aDepartamento de Ecologı´a, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain bSchool of Forest Resources and Conservation Cited by: NASA Satellite Detects Red Glow to Map Global Ocean Plant Health. This data-based map shows the "fluorescence yield" of phytoplankton in the oceans during "Fluorescence yield" is the fraction of absorbed sunlight that is given off by the plants as fluorescence and it changes with the health or stress of the phytoplankton.

    Fluorescence characteristics of humic-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter produced by various taxa of marine bacteria K Shimotori, K Watanabe, T Hama Aquatic Microbial Ecology 65 (3), Cited by: The present invention discloses a process of extraction, purification and characterization of a non-polar fluorescent dye from a marine echinoderm Holothuria scabra, compositions containing the dye and various applications of the dye, said dye is a natural, cell permeant, nontoxic and environmentally friendly non-polar fluorescent by: 9.


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Marine bacteria as a source of dissolved fluorescence in the ocean by Paula G. Coble Download PDF EPUB FB2

Biogeochemistry of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter, Second Edition, focuses on the chemical constituents of DOM and its biogeochemical, biological, and ecological significance in the global ocean, and provides a single, unique source for the references, information, and informed judgments of the community of marine biogeochemists.

Marine microorganisms are defined by their habitat as the microorganisms living in a marine environment, that is, in the saltwater of a sea or ocean or the brackish water of a coastal estuary.A microorganism (or microbe or microbial) is any microscopic living organism, that is, any life form too small for the naked human eye to really see, needing a microorganisms: Viruses, Prokaryotes, Bacteria.

The fluorescence of the algae degradation products during the first week is illustrated in Fig. 10 for the experiment in pure water, and in Fig. 11 for that in natural water (M2 — June ). The same fluorescence intensity scale was used for all these EEM plots, allowing an easy visual comparison of the different peaks' relative by:   Most of the ocean is dark.

Yet it is in this darkness, away from photosynthesizing sunlight, that most planetary carbon cycling occurs. Pachiadaki et al. show that nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in one phylum are the predominant fixers of dissolved inorganic carbon in the mesopelagic ocean.

The authors sequenced thousands of single amplified genomes of marine by:   “Marine bacteria as a source of dissolved fluorescence in the ocean” Dr. Robert B. Gagosian, Advisor University of Delaware, College of Marine Studies, Lewes, DE M.S Biological Marine Studies, ”Tidal variation in phytoplankton production” Dr.

Jonathan Sharp, Advisor Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA. Sources and Distributions of Dissolved Organic Matter by Fluorescence Method in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean Article (PDF Available) in Ocean and Polar Research 29(2) June with Fluorescence characteristics of humic-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter produced by various taxa of marine bacteria Article in Aquatic Microbial Ecology 65(3) March with   Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres.

(, October 1). Chemical memory of seawater: Scientists examine biomolecules dissolved in the ocean and read them like a history book. The nitrogen (N) cycle is composed of multiple transformations of nitrogenous compounds, catalyzed primarily by microbes.

The N cycle controls the availability of nitrogenous nutrients and biological productivity in marine systems and thus is linked to the fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and export of carbon from the ocean's surface (). Cited by: 3 University of Wales-Bangor, School of Ocean Sciences, Menai Bridge, Anglesey, LL59 5AB, UK; (at) ABSTRACT Measuring the chromophoric fraction of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in natural waters using its fluorescence signal is extremely useful in a variety of marine and freshwater applications.

The. The concentration of the complex material increased with depth, corresponding to an increase in the total dissolved fluorescence. The relative contribution of individual fluorescent compounds to total extractable fluorescence decreased from 13% at the surface to 2% at by: 5.

Description: Larvaceans and copepods excrete fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) Juanita Urban-Rich a,*, James T. McCarty a, Diego Ferna´ndez b, Jose Luis Acun˜ab Like this book. You can publish your book online for free in a few minutes.

Continuous field estimation of dissolved organic carbon concentration and biochemical oxygen demand using dual-wavelength fluorescence, turbidity and temperature. Hydrological Processes, Cited by: 2. Many creatures in the sea glow in the depths of the deepest trenches of the oceans.

Bioluminescence is even observed in some marine bacteria, which emit a steady light once they have attained a certain level of concentration of organic particles in ocean waters, which is known as quorum sensing.

Ocean water is % pure water and dissolved solids make up about % of the mass of ocean water. Explain the effects marine organisms have on the chemistry of ocean water. Neptune fill this zones waters and are the source of much of fish and seafood that humans eat.

Marine bacteria to fight tough infections Date: January 9, Source: University of Copenhagen Summary: Aggressive infections are a growing health problem all over the world. Within the three major components of water- microscopic algae, coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and non-algal particles, only the first two have fluorescence properties.

Blue fluorescence of CDOM appears by excitation with UV rays, red fluorescence of algal cells –or in fact, of the algal pigment chlorophyll a- is excited by blue light. Characterization of dissolved organic matter fluorescence in the South Atlantic Bight with use of PARAFAC model: Relationships between fluorescence and its components, absorption coefficients and organic carbon concentrations.

Mar. Chem.,22 –Cited by:   Biogeochemistry of Marine Dissolved Organic Matter, Second Edition, focuses on the chemical constituents of DOM and its biogeochemical, biological, and ecological significance in the global ocean, and provides a single, unique source for the references, information, and informed judgments of the community of marine : Marine bacteria play a major role in the ocean's nutrient cycles.

sewage into the oceans releases huge numbers of bacteria and viruses into the water. These microbes normally live in the intestinal tracts of humans and other warm-blooded animals. Abstract. It is now recognized that bacteria and microheterotrophs play an important part in marine ecosystems (see Hobbie et al., ; Sieburth et al., ; Sieburth,; Sorokin,).This chapter is concerned with bacteria that live freely in the water column or on sand grains, as opposed to those on detritus particles, because detritus and detritivory are covered in Cited by: The marine environment possesses a wide range of diverse habitats from which novel sources of natural products can be derived.

Marine microorganisms produce a diverse array of metabolites with novel chemical structures and potent antibacterial activities. Now-a-days, microbial pathogens show antibiotic resistance. Marine bacteria have been shown to produce antibacterial compounds as.

Kiorboe, T. & Jackson, G. A. Marine snow, organic solute plumes, and optimal chemosensory behavior of bacteria.

Limnol. Oceanogr. 46, – ().This paper presents a model of marine Cited by: